Our Advisory Committee

In 2020, AITC-C and its Board of Directors welcomed seven members to the Board Advisory Committee. These appointed sector professionals support us as volunteers with external perspective and expertise, in our quest to achieving AITC's vision and goals. 

Agassou Jones

Agassou Jones

Nova Scotia
Augy.Jones@novascotia.ca

Agriculture and community have been an interest of mine, especially in my adult life. I grew up as an urban kid in Halifax, NS...but had a dad who hunted, fished and loved the outdoors. He shared this love with his children. We have a large rural population of African Nova Scotians provincially who have farmed the land for over 300 years.

Once I received my teacher's degree in 1991, I went to the Caribbean to teach for 10 years and got re-introduced to the importance (and profitability) of agriculture. I am presently the Director of ANS Education in my home province and am dedicated to promoting agriculture to today's youth in the school system.

Becky Parker

Becky Parker

British Columbia
bparker@bcac.ca

Growing up as the seventh generation on my family farm in Ontario, I developed a deep appreciation for the important role agriculture plays in caring for the environment, fueling the economy, and nourishing our population. While I have been fortunate to spend my life close to agriculture, I know most Canadians are removed from food production.

Many people have questions about farming and its impact on the health of their families and the health of our planet. I have spent over 10 years working in agriculture communications with the goal of helping to answer some of those questions and to tell truthful, positive stories of Canadian agriculture.

Having worked for both AgScape and AITC-Canada, I am honoured to have the chance to continue supporting ag education in this board advisory role.

Kelly Green

Kelly Green

Manitoba
KELLYG@CCGA.CA

My grandfather was the first person to farm a ¼ section of short-grass prairie nestled along a creek in the rolling hills of southern Saskatchewan. Today, three generations of our family continue to farm the land my grandfather settled more than 100 years ago. The passion that I have for this land and this farm, is the same passion I have for connecting youth to agriculture and its importance to our food, our environment, and our future.

Agriculture in the Classroom empowers Canadian educators and youth to learn about how agriculture touches our lives in so many ways. From the nutritious foods that reach our tables, to the landscapes that are homes to wildlife and food for honeybees, to the over 2 million agriculture and agri-food jobs that employ Canadians from coast to coast - Canadian agriculture is all around us.

Lindsey Verhaeghe

Lindsey Verhaeghe

Alberta
Lindsey.Verhaeghe@Nutrien.com

Growing up on a cattle ranch in Southern Alberta instilled a strong appreciation and respect for those who work in agriculture. I have spent over 14 years collaborating on agriculture education programs because people deserve to know where their food comes from. I’ve had the pleasure of working with community partners and producers around the world - travelling to Argentina, Australia and across North America – and there is always a shared passion for advancing agriculture. Sustainably feeding nearly 10 billion people by the year 2050 is a challenge we must work together on and the opportunities are endless.

Nadine Sisk

Nadine Sisk

Ontario
nadinesisk@outlook.com

When I was growing up, every school year included a trip to a local farm and an outing to Agribition. We also made trips to grocery stores and food manufacturing facilities, too. As a result, I grew up knowing about where my food came from.

Having access to education about agriculture made me confident about the food at my local grocery store. Everyone should be so lucky, but having spent over a decade working in ag communications, I have seen firsthand what happens when people receive misinformation; needless fears arise, causing families to worry about the food they feed their kids.

The truth is that Canadians have access to an abundance of safe and affordable food. Ag in the Classroom plays an important role by helping students and teachers think critically about how Canadian farmers operate and by reassuring them about the safety of our food system.

Teresa Vallotton

Teresa Vallotton

Manitoba
tlvallotton@gmail.com

Technology is impacting every sector of agriculture. I am proud to be a fourth generation farmer and I am optimistic about the possibilities for my daughters in agriculture because of ag tech. I
am passionate about ensuring that everyone knows that there is a place for them in modern
agriculture. From livestock production to greenhouses and from commodity crops to
aquaculture and vineyards, primary producers are supported by people working in machine
learning, graphic design, market analytics and artificial intelligence. Agriculture needs
technology to meet global food demands. As a host for over 25 international ag trainees, I have
learned about global agriculture and interesting tech solutions being used in other countries. I
have used my voice, as a teacher and entrepreneur, to engage young people in an inclusive
and wide-reaching view of high-tech agriculture. I am happy to support the work of Ag In the
Classroom Canada as it is uniquely positioned to share this message on a national scale.
In addition to being a BAC member, I can be found using ag tech daily as a drone pilot,
equipment operator, 4-H leader, and agvocate.

Trish Jordan

Trish Jordan

Manitoba
Trish.Jordan@Bayer.com

I am passionate about enhancing agricultural awareness. I grew up in the city but agriculture was all around me. For the past 37-years, I’ve had the privilege of working in Canadian agriculture. While I have been fortunate to learn the incredible story of Canadian agriculture first-hand, not everyone has the same opportunity. There are many misunderstandings and mysteries about how food is grown, and I’ve spent most of my working life trying to share the true story of agriculture with others. That’s why I love organizations such as Agriculture in the Classroom. When we offer educators curriculum and programs that expose students to agriculture in an engaging, fun and educational way, this helps eliminate the misunderstandings and mysteries. When students ask questions and explore where their food comes from, they gain knowledge of how everyone in our sector works together to bring safe, affordable, high-quality food to their tables and to the world. We need the support of many to reach more teachers and students, enhance agricultural literacy, expose students to career opportunities and help bridge the gap between farming and food. I am honoured to be part of this work!